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Choosing the right pillow – Pillow theory and ergonomic sleep

Choosing the right pillow – Pillow theory and ergonomic sleep

Posted Feb 4, 2015 by

Posted In: Ask the Physiotherapist, Back Pain, baseball, Clinic News, Contests, Ergonomics, foot pain, Golfing, Health & Wellness, Leg Injury, Local News, Manual Therapy, Neck Pain, Nutrition, Osteoporosis, Patient Study, Physiotherapist Advice, Physiotherapy, Running, Services, Shoulder Injury, Soccer, Sports, Sports Injury, Sprains, TPI Assessment,

Pillows are tricky.

You want a pillow  to fill in all the “spaces” around your neck to keep your head/neck in a neutral position while you sleep (not flexed forward, not rotated or tilted to the side).  If you sleep mostly on your side, it means filling in the distance between your shoulder and head (doesn’t have to be huge, but you don’t want to collapse down toward the bed).  Your neck is narrower than your head, so some squish-ability will allow you to scrunch it up under your neck so there’s a bit more stuff there and a bit less under your head.  I don’t love the contoured pillows.  They don’t seem to fit anybody.  I like a squish- able synthetic or down so you can change the shape to suit you.

Kate Kennedy Physiotherapist at Main Street Physiotherapy Clinic in Vancouver.

 

“I came to Mike after a car accident in December 2013.  I have never had a care provider who has done as much as he has to help me get better and who has focused on the entirety of the situation and how it can affect healing instead of just the immediate problem at hand.  It has been a long road, but he uses a variety of techniques (including large needles which terrify me, but I have to admit work incredibly well) and is always looking beyond just the symptoms for the actual causes.  Since getting pregnant while still rehabilitating, he has been able to provide exercises and ideas to help with the pain that has come from the changes due to pregnancy coupled with the previous problems before.  He’s even managed to find ways to alleviate pain that is considered “normal” and just par for the course.  I simply can’t recommend Mike enough and already have sent anyone who is in need his way.”

~ T. Cassels. Read More